14 Halloween Kids Movies to Stream Right Now

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I’m not ready for Halloween, but my kids sure are. They’re tossing pumpkins into my supermarket cart, trying their costumes on daily and begging for candy corn, hoping it counts as a vegetable. As if!

So how do I feed their insatiable Halloween hunger before the big day? With Halloween movies, of course. They’re chock full of witches, monsters and ghosts, but with age-appropriate thrills that evoke more laughter than screams.

Here are 14 Halloween movies available to stream right now, or whenever you need a break. To help you choose, we’ve organized them from youngest to oldest viewers. Happy Hallo-screening!

Room on the Broom (Netflix/Amazon)

Based on a popular children’s book and Oscar-nominated to boot, this adorable short film about a kindly witch and her animal friends can withstand many re-watchings without you ripping your hair out.

Super Monsters Save Halloween (Netflix)

Preschoolers with powers – aka the Super Monsters – rescue a town that’s lost its Halloween spirit, while helping a nervous friend overcome Halloween jitters.

The Cat in the Hat knows A Lot About Halloween (Amazon)

Everybody’s favorite know-it-all cat takes Nick and Sally on a Halloween thrill ride that includes shopping for costumes in this hour-long special.

Alvin and the Chipmunks Meet the Wolfman (Netflix)

When singing chipmunks Alvin, Simon and Theodore put on a production of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Alvin has nightmares and begins to suspect their creepy neighbor is really a werewolf.

Mickey’s House of Villains (Netflix)

You’re invited to a Halloween night party hosted by Disney’s most dastardly villains, from Ursula the Sea Witch to Captain Hook, who introduce a collection of classic animated shorts.

Dear Dracula (Netflix)

Sam writes a fan letter to his favorite monster, Dracula, and gets the surprise of his life when his idol comes for a visit. Poor Dracula is suffering a crisis of confidence, wondering if he’s ever scary anymore. Can Sam help Dracula get his monster mojo back?

The Mini Witch (Amazon)

A young witch named Fuchsia befriends a human boy against her wizard father’s wishes, but the boy proves to be a good friend, warning the witches that humans plan to build a highway through their forest. (Ages 6+)

Casper’s Scare School (Netflix)

Casper the Friendly Ghost is sent to boarding school to learn how to be scarier. Instead, he foils an evil plot and stays true to his sweet little pasty self.

Monsters vs. Aliens (Netflix)

On her wedding day, Susan is struck by a meteor and grows to 50 feet tall. Captured by the government, she trains with other so-called monsters to fight aliens who are trying to invade Earth. The all-star voice cast includes Reese Witherspoon, Seth Rogan, Stephen Colbert and Paul Rudd, making it a fun flick for mom too.

Spooky Stakeout (Amazon)

In this live action adventure, four young ghost hunters are hired to solve the mystery of a haunted castle. Can “Team Spooky” find the ghost before it finds them?

Vampire Dog (Netflix)

The new kid in town is friendless at Lugosi High (get it?) until he inherits a dog named Fang who not only talks but turns out to be vampire with magical powers. Good news for his owner—Fang needs red Jell-O, not blood, to survive.

The Nightmare Before Christmas (Hulu)

Halloween and Christmas collide in Tim Burton’s spooky/funny stop-motion animation musical. Bigger kids will get a kick out of creepy Jack Skellington, the pumpkin king of Halloween Town who kidnaps Santa and takes over his job.

Coraline (Netflix)

An 11-year-old girl unlocks a portal to an alternate universe where everyone has buttons for eyes. At first, she prefers the parallel world, until she realizes how dangerous it really is. Not for Halloweenies, this movie is recommended only for older kids who enjoy a good scare.

Ghostbusters (Netflix)

You’ve seen the hilarious comedy about busting ghosts in the Big Apple, but are your kids ready? It’s got some suggestive scenes (remember the key master and the gatekeeper?), saucy language (“this man has no dick”) and sudden scares (that library ghost!), but older tweens and teens will eat it up–so who you gonna call?